Loch Ness Monster of Edinburgh

Loch Ness is the highlights of Scotland for tour. You will enjoy a city tour of Edinburgh and see some of the main attractions such as the Old Town quarter and the Scott Monument. Visit the beautiful Edinburgh Castle, where you can explore the Royal apartments including a tiny room in which Mary, Queen of Scots gave birth to the boy who was to become King of Scotland and England. While in Edinburgh, don’t miss the dazzling Scottish Crown Jewels.

Loch Ness Monster
Photo: weblogs.sun-sentinel.com

Loch Ness
Loch Ness is a large, deep, freshwater loch in the Scottish Highlands extending for approximately 37 km southwest of Inverness. Its surface is 15.8 m above sea level. Loch Ness is best known for the alleged sightings of the legendary Loch Ness Monster, also known as “Nessie”. Loch Ness is over twenty miles long and hundreds of feet deep in places. The loch is notorious for its murkyness, as the water is filled with slime, peat, and mud. The loch’s murkyness and depth may be one of the reasons why the Loch Ness monster’s existance has not yet been proven. Some people think caverns under the loch connect to the ocean.

Urquhart Castle
Urquhart Castle is one of the more popular Scottish castles, with visitors combining an exploration of the ruins with a bit of monster spotting from its walls. Urquhart stands on a sandstone promontory jutting into Loch Ness from the north-west, overlooking Urquhart Bay.

Urquhart Castle
Photo: wallpaperpimper.com

The site was defended from attack from the landward side by a ditch up to about 30.5 metres wide and 4.6-5.2 metres deep, and this was crossed by a bridge with high walls on either side of the path, broken in the middle by a drawbridge. This bridge led out from a massive twin-cylindrical-towered gatehouse in the length of the high stone curtain wall that skirted the west side of the castle.

The curtain followed the contour of the irregular rocky ground of the promontory, and it survives in part, although not to its full height. At the north-east end of the curtain is the ruined shell of the great tower which has its south wall missing, and which is built of rubble with freestone dressings. Its walls are 3-3.6 metres thick and it rises to tour stories.

Edinburgh Castle
Edinburgh Castle is a castle fortress which dominates the skyline of the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, from its position atop the volcanic Castle Rock. Human habitation of the site is dated back as far as the 9th century BC, although the nature of early settlement is unclear. There has been a royal castle here since at least the reign of David I in the 12th century, and the site continued to be a royal residence until the Union of the Crowns in 1603.

Edinburgh Castle
Photo: studyabroadfoundation.org

As one of the most important fortresses in the Kingdom of Scotland, Edinburgh Castle has been involved in many historical conflicts, from the Wars of Scottish Independence in the 14th century, up to the Jacobite Rising of 1745, and has been besieged, both successfully and unsuccessfully, on several occasions. From the later 17th century, the castle became a military base, with a large garrison.

Its importance as a historic monument was recognized from the 19th century, and various restoration programs have been carried out since. It is also the backdrop to the annual Edinburgh Military Tattoo, and has become a recognizable symbol of Edinburgh and of Scotland.

Sources: castles.org, wikipedia.org

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